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Review: “Death Wish” is a Clunky Mess of Guns-Gushing Insanity

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I always admired Death Wish more as an oddity than a genuinely great action picture. It’s a little hard to become invested in a film series known for gratuitous amounts of graphic violence and rape, many times in the same scene. And while the Death Wish remake thankfully avoids become the exploitation mess it could have been, the film is still just as odd for its unusual mix of commentary and comedy amid bullets and blood.

Bruce Willis now plays the role of Paul Kersey, appearing with far less hair on his head, now a Chicago surgeon as opposed to a New York architect. He has to witness day after day multiple patients with gunshot wounds rushed into the ER. It’s draining work, but he can still have fun at his lovely home with his beautiful wife and college-bound daughter. Surely nothing terrible will happen to them because they’re so carefree and all smiles. They’re built up to be such a sugary family that the inevitable beating the wife and daughter receives only occurs after they decide to make a birthday cake for Paul secretly.

I will give Eli Roth credit in that the expected inciting incident that sets off Paul is not as hard to watch as the original. Rather than draw out a long and uncomfortable rape of a mother and daughter that leaves one dead and the other in a coma, the scene is kept tense with the tease for a sexual assault that doesn’t get very far and gunshots quite subtle. That being said, Roth doesn’t disappoint in the rest of the violence that becomes just as cartoonish as it does gory. Blood will splatter, neck cracked, and one unlucky thug has his skull crushed as his brains spill out.

Roth’s film is one that’s hard to love for its seesawing of gritty drama and over-the-top violence. You can probably guess which category he excels at best. When Willis is going on the hunt and making snarky remarks, he’s in his element. When he’s trying to look sad and depressed with contemplating losing his family, however, the heart isn’t there, and his acting becomes downright awkward to watch as he stumbles through his quieter scenes. Almost of mercy, the film is aware enough of these shortfalls and slowly steers the focus away from the dramatic elements. It’s a smart move, but it would have been an even better move if Rothe embraced more of the crazy than the relatable.

Several aspects of Paul’s crusade come with consequences, but they’re rarely explored. There’s no point made in bringing up the dangers of copycat vigilantes that are gunned down in the street if Paul ignores, turning off a news report and then never addressing it again. Why even bother having morning radio debates on the slippery slope of Paul’s revenge spree when they’re just as quickly swept under the rug? Rather than dig deep into these issues or cut them out for the sake of campy violence, Roth decides to dance around them, taunting the audience with his film being culturally relevant, but not really.

And it can’t be ignored how poorly timed this movie was with the current state of arguing about gun control. While the film had reportedly been pushed back because of the Vegas shooting, now it has the uncomfortable awkwardness of coming out after the Parkland shooting. I don’t want to hold that against the film, but it should be noted that this film was pretty much a love letter for the NRA. This film doesn’t just showcase a lot of guns; it loves firearms to a ridiculous degree. When Paul becomes inspired to go out and buy one, he’s greeted in the gun shop by a bouncy blonde that perkily sets him up with a form and dismisses how tough gun safety classes are to pass, reasoning that anyone can qualify. This type of attitude would set off red flags about gun access in Chicago, but all Paul gathers from that visit is “Man, it sure takes a lot of work to get a gun. Better go steal one of a gangster.”

Death Wish has its demographic down for targeting middle-aged Americans who love guns and want to take a bite out of the next generation with their dentures. Willis is a snarky anti-hero who loves shooting young punks, Vincent D’Onofrio is an all-American guy gunning for a union job, Dean Norris is a pursuing detective that thinks gluten-free foods are yucky, and the soundtrack boasts top hits of classic rock. All it’s missing is a Make America Great Again hat, Willis fumbling with a smartphone, and a preachy rant about how lazy millennials are to be the elderly audience movie of the year.

And I honestly would have been okay with this over-the-top presentation if Roth decided to keep this film where it firmly belongs in cartoony gore land, going so far as to have a goon killed by a bowling ball falling off a shelf. But when he ventures outside this territory, into the world of gun violence, being a real issue with dire consequences, the cracks in the entertainment value become uncomfortably thick, as if Tarantino meshed footage of Schindler’s List into Inglourious Basterds. I wanted to like Death Wish for being a bullet and blood bonanza, but not when it tries to make a point of all this madness, only to trail off into another silly segment of Willis getting in an ouch-inducing kill. Such inconsistencies made me wish this tired franchise had stayed buried, coming out as the wrong film at the wrong time.

[author title=”About the Author” image=”http://popstermedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/mark_mcpherson-300×221-150×150.jpg”]Movie Reviewer Mark McPherson has been all about movies since working at a video store in his youth. His talents range from video editing to animation to web development, but movies have always been his passion to write about.[/author]


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“Captain Marvel” Retains Top Slot at the Box Office

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It’s no surprise that in its second weekend, the first Marvel Cinematic Universe of 2019 is still riding high. Captain Marvel, the latest in the MCU with Brie Larson starring as the lead, generated another $69 million over the weekend, placing its domestic total at $266 million. Tallying up the international box office, the film’s global total to date is $760 million. Despite the online controversy, the film is looking to be another strong box office smash for Disney and Marvel.

As for the premieres for the weekend, and there were plenty, they were all over the map. Just below Captain Marvel was the animated adventure Wonder Park, bringing in $16 million, another film with controversy when the director’s name was removed from the picture after sexual harassment charges. Five Feet Apart, the dying teen drama about a romance amid cystic fibrosis, only came in at #3 with a weekend gross of $13 million. And debuting the lowest in the top 10 for debuts was Captive State, a sci-fi dystopian tale, only making $3 million. The film debuted so low the little film No Manches Frida 2 was able to sneak about it at #6 with a gross of $3.8 million.

Drops were fairly low all around for the returning films, mostly because Captain Marvel was dominating the previous weekend. The only milestone worth noting is that The LEGO Movie 2, after six weeks at the box office, finally cracked $100 million. And the sun is now setting on Green Book’s post-Oscar run by coming in at #10 for the final weekend of its top 10 run over the past few weeks.

View the full top ten weekend box office results below:

Captain Marvel ($69,318,000)

Wonder Park ($16,000,000)

Five Feet Apart ($13,150,000)

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World ($9,345,000)

Tyler Perry’s A Madea Family Funeral ($8,085,000)

No Manches Frida 2 ($3,894,000)

Captive State ($3,163,000)

The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part ($2,135,000)

Alita: Battle Angel ($1,900,000)

Green Book ($1,277,000)

Next weekend, Captain Marvel may very well have some competition when Jordan Peele’s new horror film Us hits over 3,600 theaters.


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“Dragon” Continues To Soar, “Funeral” Close Behind, “Green Book” Back

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With little competition for the weekend, How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World, the third in the animated fantasy saga, was able to secure the box office once more. In its second weekend, the animated epic made $30 million to push its domestic total to $97 million. So far the film has done about the same as the previous film and is on track to stay in the top 10 for a few more weeks in March.

Debuts this weekend were small with one big exception. Tyler Perry’s latest Madea film, A Madea Family Funeral, naturally made a relatively big splash with its dedicated audience. Starting at #2, the film made $27 million for its first weekend. No word on the budget yet but it’s most likely on a budget as most Tyler Perry productions are, so it’s safe to call this a success, especially for debuting with a box office so close to Dragon.

The rest of the premieres were not as strong at all. Greta, the new thriller starring Chloe Moretz, debuted all the way down at #8 with $4.5 million box office. To be fair, however, the film was in a constant battle for its spot as three other films also reported earnings around $4 million for the weekend. Of note, Green Book, fresh off winning the Academy Award for Best Picture one weekend ago, splashed back into more theaters to arise even higher in the top 10 with its domestic total now sitting at $73 million. Don’t count on it remaining there long as bigger blockbusters will be swooping as we plow through the last remnants of winter movies.

Check out the full listing of the top 10 box office weekend results below:

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World ($30,046,000)

Tyler Perry’s A Madea Family Funeral ($27,050,000)

Alita: Battle Angel ($7,000,000)

The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part ($6,615,000)

Green Book ($4,711,000)

Fighting With My Family ($4,691,284)

Isn’t it Romantic ($4,645,000)

Greta ($4,585,000)

What Men Want ($2,700,000)

Happy Death Day 2U ($2,516,000)

Next weekend is once again all about Marvel as their latest superhero solo film, Captain Marvel, will be appearing in 4,100 theaters.


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Review: “Captain Marvel” is a Solidly Sensational Sci-Fi Adventure

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Captain Marvel joins the ranks of the Marvel Cinematic Universe in a much different way. She slides into the MCU via a twisty sci-fi adventure of the 1990s, before the Avengers were formed. And though the film does serve as a strong bridge picture that answers a few more questions about the Marvel universe, the film quickly becomes its own thing and gives its hero a real identity as the powerful addition to the superhero ensemble.

Brie Larson plays Carol Danvers, a woman not sure if she’s a human pilot of Earth or a soldier of the Kree empire’s Starforce. There’s little time to explore these conflicting visions she’s having when there’s special energy powers to control and a war being waged against the shape-shifting Skrull alien creatures. A detour to 1990s Earth gives her a bit of time to find out more while also hunting down some more Skrulls, leading to some interesting scenarios when combatting aliens that could look like old ladies.

Marvel Studios’ CAPTAIN MARVEL..Captain Marvel (Brie Larson) ..Photo: Film Frame..©Marvel Studios 2019

Carol’s landing on Earth leads to treading down familiar Marvel timeline territory as well as evoking plenty of dated 1990s bits. What started drawing me into the picture was how the film holds itself back from the obvious. The 1990s setting is used for some gags of video stores and Windows 95, sure, but never goes the extra mile of becoming an aggravating reference fest, keeping a certain vibe the way Guardians of the Galaxy embraced the 1970s and 1980s. And just like that film, there’s a nostalgic soundtrack to boot, with choice tracks for just the right cue.

Samuel L. Jackson pops up in the film as a younger Nick Fury with his two eyes still intact. He teams up with Carol in her intergalactic spy adventure and thankfully never goes to the booming lengths he was known for that decade. And the filmmakers could have easily made this younger Fury go full Die Hard 3 or Pulp Fiction but he never does, always keeping that cool persona he has been known for in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Marvel Studios’ CAPTAIN MARVEL..L to R: Att-Lass (Algenis Perez Soto), Captain Marvel (Brie Larson) and Minn-Erva (Gemma Chan)..Photo: Film Frame..©Marvel Studios 2019

But the one aspect that is never shunned and built up grandly is the aspect of female empowerment. Danvers is established as a woman who doesn’t have a clear identity or mindful nature of galactic politics and has to build herself up when she realizes she may be a very powerful pawn in a big game of intergalactic chess. Her memories are that of always being told to back off from non-traditional activities for girls and, sure enough, she rises up to become the smirking and energy-shooting hero when the final piece of her character puzzle is pieced together. It’s just unfortunate that the film spends so much time doing the building amid a twisty sci-fi spy story that Brie never gets a moment to shine as brightly as she could, despite a very enthusiastic third-act closer.

If we’re being blunt, no, Captain Marvel doesn’t quite have the same gravity to be a cultural milestone of a comic book movie. Where others have pointed to Black Panther as not the first the most insightful and cultural of black-led superhero movies, I doubt many will look towards Captain Marvel as the grandest of female-led comic book movies, making its motives known with the power and subtlety of a supernova. But, in terms of what the film is aiming towards, it doesn’t have to prove anything to anyone and that’s perhaps the point. I just wish that Captain Marvel’s astounding powers to destroy starships and aliens had a much bigger punch for a picture that wants to obliterate the glass ceiling and merely cuts a narrow hole within the MCU. It’s a nice hole, mind you, and still weaves a capable and compelling sci-fi adventure with a surprisingly more engaging finale than most Marvel solos.


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